Week 18 Autumn

Enjoy this post from our Groundswell Community Farm Cookbook. The pictures were taken last year in October.
Autumn
The harvest, the beauty, the frost
 
Celeriac
Celeriac, or celery root, has a nice, mild celery flavor with a typical root texture.
Cut in matchsticks for a French cuisine inspired coleslaw!  Celeriac is often used baked and pureed in soups or mashed with potatoes.  I also enjoy celeriac stir-fried and grated raw in salads.
Chop the tops off ½ to one inch above the root and store in a sealed bag in the
fridge.  These also keep for months in a root cellar.
 
Celeriac Au Gratin
From Asparagus to Zucchini. 
I’ve heard this dish is also excellent with kohlrabi.
 
1 pound celeriac bulbs, peeled and sliced into 1/8 inch
2 T butter
1 T flour
1 cup chicken broth or vegetable broth
salt & pepper to taste
1 cup grated Swiss or cheddar cheese
Simmer celeriac in water over medium heat until tender, 15-20 minutes.  Drain.  In medium saucepan, melt butter, add flour, and cook until golden.  Slowly, whisk is stock; cook until thickened.  Add salt and pepper.  Place drained celeriac in shallow baking dish; top with sauce, sprinkle with cheese, and bake at 375 degrees until golden, about 15 minutes.  Makes 4 – 6 servings
 
Mashed Celeriac and Potatoes
From Nourishing Traditions 
 
6 Baked potatoes
3  celeriac, peeled and cut up
2 cloves Garlic, peeled and mashed
A pinch nutmeg
Sea salt
Black pepper
½ cup butter
½-1 cup cream or crème fraiche
 
1. This beats plain old mashed potatoes any day.  Cover the celery root pieces with cold water, bring to a boil and cook until very tender, about 30 minutes.
2. Cut up the butter and place in the bottom of a large bowl.  Scoop out potato flesh or put whole potatoes in the bowl.  Add the celery root and garlic, and mash all together.  Add cream to get desired consistency.  If you want your puree really smooth, you may mix with a handheld blender.  Season to taste.
3. Serve immediately or transfer to a buttered ovenproof dish and keep warm in the oven.
 
Wild Rice Celeriac Pilaf
From Asparagus to Zucchini 
 
1 T. olive oil                                                    1-cup chicken stock
¾ C. finely diced celeriac                               1 cup beef stock (or 2 cups any stock)
¼ cup finely diced onion                                 salt and pepper
1 C. wild rice, rinsed and drained                    2 T. dried cranberries
2 tsp. dried thyme
 
1. Heat olive oil in a skillet.  Add celeriac and onion; sauté until tender, about 5-7
minutes.  Stir in wild rice, thyme and stocks.  Season with salt and pepper.  Bring
to a boil, cover, and lower to a simmer.  Cook until rice is nearly tender, 30-60
minutes (time depends on the kind and age of the rice).
2. Stir in dried cranberries; cook until rice is tender, 5-15 minutes longer.  Makes 4 servings.
 
Celery
Celery with peanut butter is classic with kids.  Celery is also known for its place
in soup stocks,  and potato salads.  Celery has also found popularity with those who juice and with those who diet.  I toss it in with stir-fries or make a batch of cream of celery soup that I can’t stop eating.  Celery leaves add a lot of flavor to soup and stock and can be used in moderation in salads.
To store celery, cut off leaves and keep in a sealed bag in the refrigerator.  To
store the leaves, dry in a food dehydrator, in a warm oven or on a clean window screen in the sun.  Then store in a Ziploc baggie.  If you ever have problems with grain moths, store all your dehydrated foods in glass jars, as they will cut right through plastic bags. 
 
Nutrients:  Raw, 1 cup diced, 15 calories, 1.09 g Protein, 7 g Fiber, 3.15 g
Carbohydrates,  304 IU Vitamin A, 11 mg Vitamin C, 50 mg Calcium, 22.8 mg
Magnesium, 125 mg Sodium, 340 mg Potassium
 
Fourteen Stuffing Ideas for Celery
From  From Asparagus to Zucchini  
 
• Soft goat cheese blended with chopped arugula
• Soft goat choose blended with chopped fresh dill
• Finely chopped sorrel leaves mixed with a little mayonnaise
• Egg salad
• Tuna salad
• Chicken salad
• Caponata
• Softened cream cheese mashed with smoked fish and lemon juice
• Softened cream cheese mixed with crumbled blue cheese
• Softened cream cheese mixed with chopped green olives and chopped walnuts
• Softened cream cheese mixed with chutney
• Pureed cottage cheese mixed with pesto
• Pureed cottage cheese mixed with tpenade
• Crunchy style peanut butter, topped with dried cherries or cranberries
 
Leeks
The leek has a unique subtle onion flavor and texture.  It makes an excellent
potato soup, pot pie or shepherds pie.  Leeks are also good in sautés and non-potato soups.  To use, remove all dark green leaf layers from the tops and outside.  Rinse off the whole leek, then slit lengthwise and rinse out all layers that show indications of soil.  You can use some of the light green leaf sheathes, but bite into a few to be sure they are not tough.
To store, chop off excess green tops and seal in a bag in the fridge.  Leeks will
keep for weeks without a problem.  For long-term storage and for easier use in the winter, steam or simmer leaks until tender then cool and freeze in a freezer bag.
 
Parsnips
Ahh parsnips… We hope you enjoy this delicately sweet root as much as we do!  Bake them, boil them, fry them, grill them or eat them raw; delicious every time.
Nutrients:  Cooked, 1 cup diced, 95 calories, 2.15 g protein, 3.9 g Fiber, 22 g Carbs. 50 IU Vitamin A, 1.55 Vitamin E, 16 mg Vitamin C, 70 mg Calcium, 20 mg Magnesium, 19 mg Sodium, 588 mg Potassium
 
Roasted Parsnip Chips
From The Roasted Vegetable
 
2 lb. parsnips
2 T olive oil
1 T fresh rosemary leaves (or 1 t dried)
Salt
Pepper
 
1. Preheat the oven to 425 F.  Lightly oil a 9X13-inch baking dish.
2. In a large bowl, combine the parsnips, oil, rosemary and salt and pepper to taste. Toss to coat.  Arrange in a single layer in the baking dish.
3. Roast for about 30 minutes, until the parsnips are well browned and tender,
turning once.
4. Serve hot.
 
Rutabaga
Believed to be a hybrid of the turnip and cabbage, the rutabaga was one of the first vegetables grown by colonists in the Americas- the large root helped break up the untilled soil. Not very popular here now but it is such a versatile vegetable with high nutrient value.
 
Information found in From Asparagus to Zucchini 
Nutrients:  Cooked, cubed or sliced, 1 cup–  60 calories, 1.5 g protein, 4.8 g fiber, 13.g Carbs., 940 IU Vitamin A, 36 mg Vitamin C, 90 mg Calcium, 11.9 mg Magnesium, 8 mg Sodium, 284 mg Potassium
 
“You Won’t Believe These” Brown Roasted Rutabaga Wedges
MACSAC
4 medium rutabagas                   3 T. high quality balsamic vinegar
2 T. Olive oil                             Sea salt
 
Heat oven to 500F.  Cut ends off rutabagas and peel them Use a heavy sharp knife to cut each rutabaga in half lengthwise, then cut each half into 3-4 wedges.  Place wedges in very large baking pan and toss with olive oil to coat them well.  Spread them out into a single layer and try to keep them from touching one another. Roast in hot oven 20 minutes.  Use tongs to turn each wedge over. Roast another 15-20 minutes.  Remove from oven and toss with balsamic vinegar and salt to taste.  Serve hot. This “hot-oven” approach to roasting is credited to cookbook author Barbara Kafka.  Makes 6-8 servings.
 
Sweet Potato
Yum! Baked with butter, in soups, in breads, marinated in salads- all good!
Nutrients:  Baked in skin and then peeled, 5” x2”, 160 calories, 2.4 g protein, 4.1 g fiber, 37 g Carbs, 9230 IU Vitamin A,  6 mg Vitamin E, 25 mg Vitamin C, 46 mg Calcium, 13.7 mg Magnesium, 17 mg Sodium, 342 mg Potassium
 
Tamari-Glazed Sweet Potatoes
From Local Flavors
 
3 large sweet potatoes
1 T roasted sesame oil
2 T brown sugar
2 T mirin or sweet sherry
1 T minced garlic
3 T tamari, shoyu or soy sauce
¼ cup water
1 T toasted sesame seeds
 
1. Preheat the oven to 400 F.  Scrub the sweet potatoes and cut them lengthwise into quarters or halves.  Place them in a baking dish roomy enough to hold them in a single layer.
2. Combine the rest of the ingredients except the sesame seeds.  Brush all of the
resulting sauce over the sweet potatoes, then cover the dish tightly with foil.  Bake until nearly tender, 50 minutes to an hour.  Remove the foil, baste the sweet
potatoes with their juices and return to the oven until the liquid has reduced to a
glaze and the potatoes are fully tender, 15 – 20 minutes longer.  Sprinkle with the
sesame seeds and serve.
 
Sweet Potato Crescent Rolls
From Simply in Season Anna:  “I made these for Christmas dinner – a real hit!  They are healthy AND delicious.”
 
1½ cups whole wheat bread flour
¼ cup sugar
1 T. active dry yeast
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
½ tsp. ground nutmeg
¼ tsp. ground ginger
¼ tsp. ground allspice or
pumpkin pie spice mix
1 cup sweet potatoes, cooked & mashed
(or 1 cup mashed squash or pumpkin)
1 cup milk
¼ cup butter
1 large egg, beaten
2 – 2½ cups bread flour
2 T. butter, melted
 
1. Combine flour, sugar, yeast, salt and spices in a large bowl.
2. Combine sweet potatoes, milk and butter in large saucepan and cook over
medium heat, stirring until butter is melted and mixture is warm.  Add to flour
mixture.  Beat with mixer set on low speed, scraping bowl often, until mixture is
all moistened, 1-2 minutes.
3. Add egg to mixture and beat at medium speed for 3 minutes.
4. Stir in enough flour by hand to make dough easy to handle.  Turn onto floured
surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 7-9 minutes.  Place in greased
bowl, turn to grease both sides, cover with a damp cloth, and let rise until doubled in bulk.  Punch down dough and divide it in half.  Roll each half of dough on lightly floured surface into a 12-inch circle.
5. Brush each circle with 1 T. butter. Cut into 12 wedges and tightly roll up each
wedge from wide end to point. Place crescent rolls point-side down on greased
baking sheet. Cover and let rise until doubled.
6. Bake in preheated oven at 375 F until golden brown, 10-12 minu
 
Spaghetti Squash
What a delightful substitute for pasta in spaghetti.  Also great as a side dish with butter, salt and pepper.
1 large spaghetti squash
butter or olive oil
garlic powder or fresh garlic
sea salt, to taste
black pepper, to taste
 
1. Cut squash in half, scoop out just the seeds in the center with a large spoon, place it flesh side up in a cookie sheet.  Liberally spread with butter or olive oil,
sprinkle with garlic powder, salt, and fresh ground black pepper.
2. Let it bake at 400 degrees for 25 minutes (more or less depending on the size of your squash).
3. When you take it out of the oven, scoop out the wonderful, soft, nutty flesh.  It
can be used as a side dish or as the meal with French bread garlic toast!
Recipe Note:  Add Italian seasoning and Parmesan cheese, when serving it with Italian foods.  Other combinations: add curry powder and cumin or fresh garlic and fresh basil.
 
Spaghetti Squash Casserole
From Nourishing Traditions
 
1 large spaghetti squash, cooked as above
2 medium onions, chopped
4 T olive oil
2 tomatoes, chopped (peel/seed if desire)
2 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
½ t dried thyme
2 T fresh basil leaves, cut up
sea salt
Black pepper
¼ cup parsley
1 cup whole grain bread crumbs
½ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
2 T melted butter
 
1. Prep your spaghetti squash and then set oven to 350 F.
2. Sauté onion in olive oil until soft.  Add tomato, garlic, thyme and basil and cook gently until most of the liquid is absorbed.
3. Mix with spaghetti squash, season to taste and pour into a well buttered Pyrex
dish.
4. Mix parsley, bread crumbs and Parmesan cheese and spread on top.  Drizzle with melted butter.
5. Bake at 350 F for ~ ½ hour or until most of the liquid is absorbed.
 
Winter Squash
I never knew what a versatile vegetable squash was until I found myself with a closet full of all kinds last winter- I had to be creative!  Squash can be found to take on sweet, spicy, or buttery characteristics in recipes.  I remember eating squash as a kid, hoping to get some of the brown sugar and butter floating in the middle.  Now I usually puree it for soups, casseroles, and pies.
 
Nutrients: Squash (winter, all varieties), baked, 1 cup mashed, 130 calories, 3.7 g protein, 9.1g Fiber, 31g Carbs, 8610 IU Vitamin A,  1.35 mg Vitamin E, 27 mg Vitamin C, 57 mg Calcium, 34.8 mg Magnesium, 1.43 mg Iron, 2mg Sodium, 945 mg Potassium
 
Butternut Tostada
From the New Moosewood Cookbook
 
1 butternut squash (or any winter squash with ~2 cups cooked pulp)
4 tortillas
1 t oil
1 t chili powder
½ t ground cumin
1 clove garlic
1 t oregano
1 cup shredded cheddar or jack cheese
4 cups shredded lettuce or other greens
salsa
toasted pumpkin seeds, optional
 
1. Cut and quarter the butternut and steam for 20 minutes, or use pulp from leftover baked squash.  Meanwhile, toast the tortillas over a gas burner or on a griddle till softly crisp.  Remove the squash pulp from the skins.
2. Heat oil in a heavy pan and sprinkle with chili powder, cumin, and garlic.  Stir
and fry until the spices are fragrant.  Add squash and oregano, stirring while
mixture heats through.
3. Place squash on tortillas, sprinkle with shredded cheese and place under broiler or in oven until cheese melts.  Remove, cover with lettuce and dot with salsa.  A handful of toasted pumpkin seeds make a delicious final touch.
 
Arabian Squash Casserole
From The New Moosewood Cookbook
“You will think you died and went to heaven! I could not stop eating this delicious dish.” -Anna
 
4 C. cooked winter squash (not spaghetti) pureed        
4 to 5 cloves garlic, minced
1 T. olive oil                                                                   
black pepper and cayenne, to taste
1 ½ C. chopped onion                                                     ½ C. firm yogurt
1 tsp salt                                                                          1 C. crumbled feta cheese
2 small bell peppers of different colors      
sunflower seeds for the top
 
preheat oven to 375F
1. Place mashed or pureed squash on a large bowl.
2. Heat the olive oil in a medium sized skillet.  Add onion, and sauté over medium
heat for about 5 minutes.  Add salt and bell peppers.  Sauté about five more minutes, or until the peppers begin to get soft.
3. Add garlic, black pepper, and cayenne, and sauté a few more minutes.
4. Add the sauté, along with yogurt and feta, to the squash, and mix well.  Spread into an ungreased 9-inch square baking pan; sprinkle the top lightly with
sunflower seeds.
5. Bake uncovered for 25 to 30 minutes, or until bubbly.
 
Stuffed Acorn Squash
From The New Laurel’s Kitchen
 
Use acorn squash, delicata, Lady Godiva, or any other small variety of squash.  A handsome colorful presentation. 
Serves 4 to 6 depending on size of squash.
3 small winter squashes                 
1 bunch spinach, or a handful of any dark leafy green
3 green onions, chopped              
 ½ to 1 cup whole wheat bread crumbs.
2 T. oil                                             ½ tsp. salt
1 C. diced celery
 
1. Preheat oven to 350 F.  Halve and clean squash.  Place cavity facedown in a
greased baking dish and bake for 25 to 45 min. until tender with a fork.  The time
will depend on which squash you choose.
2. Meantime, sauté onions in oil until soft.  Add chopped celery.  Cover and simmer on medium heat until just tender.  Add spinach; stir to wilt.  (if using kale add just before celery and chop small to avoid chewiness).
3. Stuff squashes with vegetable mixture.  Sprinkle with salted bread crumbs.
Return to oven for 10 to 15 minutes.
 
Squash Lasagna
From Katie
 
2 Pkg. Lasagna Noodles
5 large tomatoes or 2 qt canned tomatoes
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium onion
1 T olive oil
¼ cup fresh basil or 1 T dried basil
1 t oregano
Black pepper
3 cups cooked, mashed winter squash
1 Pkg. ricotta cheese
1 lb. mozzarella cheese, grated
¼ lb. fresh parmesan or Romano cheese,
grated
 
1. Preheat oven to 350 F.
2. In a large sauce pan, sauté onions and garlic for 2 minutes in olive oil.  Add
tomatoes and cook down with the lid off until your sauce is not too runny, ~20
minutes.  Add basil, oregano and pepper when you turn off the heat.
3. Meanwhile, start boiling water for the lasagna.  Cook noodles until they bend but not until they are fully cooked.  Be sure to use plenty of water and stir the noodles so they don’t stick together.
4. Get a large, deep Pyrex pan or metal cake pan and spread a ½ cup of liquid from the tomato sauce in the bottom.  Lay out all of the remaining ingredients.
5. Over the liquid on the bottom of the pan, spread a layer of noodles so the entire pan is covered.  Next spread 2 cups of winter squash and ½ of your ricotta cheese. Add another layer of noodles, the remainder of your squash and ricotta, 1/3 of your tomato sauce and 1/3 of your mozzarella.  Add another layer of noodles, 1/3 of your tomatoes and 1/3 of your mozzarella.  Add a final layer of noodles, the remainder of your tomatoes and mozzarella, then all of your Romano cheese.
6. Bake for ~50 minutes or until the cheese is golden brown.
 
Squash Soup
Great for leftover baked squash!
5 cups cubed raw winter squash or
pumpkin or 3 cups cooked
2½ cups water
1 cup chopped onion
1 T oil or butter
½ cup chopped parsley
2 t salt
2-4 cups tender greens
 
1. If you use raw squash or pumpkin, simmer in water until tender.  Puree the
cooked squash.
2. Sauté the onion in the oil.  When the onion is golden, add the parsley.  Cook just long enough to soften the parsley; then combine with squash and add salt.  Bring the soup to a simmer—don’t boil or it will stick.
3. Near the end of the cooking time, add spinach, chard or other tender greens,
chopped bite-size.  Makes about 7 cups.
 
Apple-Flavored Winter Squash Cake
From Gardeners’ Community Cookbook
 
Butter and flour for the pan
8 T (1 stick) butter, at room temperature
1½ cups sugar
2 large eggs
1½ cups cooked, mashed winter squash
½ cup apple cider
1 ¾ cups all purpose flour
1 t baking soda
½ t ground cinnamon
½ t ground nutmeg
¼ t ground cloves
¼ t ground ginger or 1 t fresh ginger
Apple cider glaze, if desired
1½ cups confectioner’s sugar
¼ cup apple cider
 
1. Preheat the oven to 350 F.  Butter and flour a 9 to 10-inch tube or bundt pan
2. In a large bowl, beat the butter until fluffy.  Slowly beat in the sugar until mixed. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition.  Add the squash and apple cider and beat until well mixed.
3. Sift together the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and ginger. Add the creamed mixture in 3 batches, beating well after each addition.
4. Pour into the pan and bake for 45 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.  Remove and cool for 10 minutes, then turn the cake out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
5. If making the glaze, sift together the confectioners sugar into a small bowl.  Add the cider and whisk until smooth.  Use right away, while still pourable and not yet crystallized

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Everything of Autumn
Russian Vegetable Bread
From New Recipes from Moosewood Restaurant:  “A rather solid, interesting bread . . . a natural for serving with soups and stews.”
1 T dry yeast
½ cup warm water
1½ cups hot water
3 T molasses
3 T vegetable oil
1 T salt
3 T chopped fresh dill
2 t caraway seeds
2 cups grated raw vegetables (beets, potatoes, carrots, parsnips, etc.)
2 cups whole wheat flour
3 – 4 cups unbleached white flour
2 cups rye flour
 
1. Oil two 5×9-inch bread pans.
2. Proof the yeast by sprinkling it over ½ cup of warm water and adding a teaspoon of molasses.  Stir and let sit about five minutes or until yeast begins to foam.
3. In a large bowl, combine 1½ cups of hot water with the molasses, oil, salt, dill, caraway seeds and grated vegetables.  Cool to lukewarm.
4. Add the yeast to the bowl along with the whole wheat flour and 1 cup of the white flour.  Beat the batter for 300 strokes.  Add the rye flour and enough of the
remaining white flour to make a stiff dough.  Turn the dough onto a floured surface and knead it for 10 to 15 minutes.
5. Place the dough in an oiled bowl, turn it to coat all sides with oil, cover it with a cloth and allow it to rise for about 1½ hours. Punch down the dough and let it rise again for about 1 hour.  Shape the dough into two loaves and place them in oiled bread pans.  Cover the loaves and allow them to rise for about 45 minutes.
6. Bake in a preheated oven at 375 F for 35 to 40 minutes.
 
Summer in Winter Salad
From Katie:  “This is one of my favorites—a fresh, local salad is really a treat in midwinter.”
Grated Veggies:  Carrots with any combination Celeriac, Beets, Kohlrabi, Cabbage, etc.
Dressing:  Your choice or
Easy Dressing:
Mix to taste:
Lemon or lime juice and/or vinegar
Oil, tahini, coconut milk, pureed avocado or a combination
Tamari, salt or soy sauce (optional)
Your choice of spices
If too intense, tone it down with water, more oil or tahini or add finely chopped
nuts.   Walnuts are great for this.
 
Winter Stew
From the New Laurel’s Kitchen 
 
cups of kale, chopped
3 large or 5 small parsnips
1 rutabaga or ¾ cup cabbage
1 smallish turnip or beet
Sauce
1 onion, chopped                  3T. shoyu
2 whole cloves garlic            1-2 T. molasses
2 stalks celery                       2 T. lemon juice
2 T. olive oil                          2 tsp. dried basil
2-4 C. stock
1. Steam kale until nearly tender.  It may take more or less time than the rest of the recipe ingredients, depending on whether it is tender or tough; if it cooks quickly, take it off earlier. You should have about 2 cups.  Drain well.  While kale is cooking, peel roots and dice in ½ inch cubes.
2. Sauté onion, garlic, and celery in olive oil.  Mash the garlic cloves with a fork and add the remaining sauce ingredients, as well as the parsnips, rutabaga, and turnip or beet.  Simmer 10 minutes. (Adjust the amount of stock to suit the way you will be serving the stew.)  Simmer until parsnips etc. are nearly tender, about 20 minutes.  Add kale and cook briefly, until everything is tender.  Serve with grain, potatoes or hot rolls.
 
2 medium beets, cut to ½ inch dice
1 small butternut squash (~1 lb.) peeled,
seeded, and cut into ½ inch dice
1 small rutabaga, peeled, cut ½ inch dice
1 medium onion, halved and slivered
6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
3 T olive oil
1 t fresh rosemary leaves or ½ t dried
Salt
Black pepper
1 lb. penne, ziti or other tubular pasta
4 oz. mild fresh goat cheese
¼ cup dry white wine
1. Preheat oven to 425 F.  Lightly oil a large shallow roasting or half sheet pan.
2. In a large bowl, combine the beets, squash, rutabaga, onion and garlic.  Add the
oil, rosemary and salt and pepper to taste.  Toss to coat well.  Arrange in a single
layer in the pan.
3. Roast for 35 to 45 minutes, until the vegetables are tender and lightly browned,
stirring or shaking the pan occasionally for even cooking.  Remove from the oven
and keep warm.
4. Meanwhile, cook the pasta in plenty of boiling salted water until al dente.  Drain
well, reserving ½ cup of the cooking water.  Transfer the pasta to a large serving
bowl and keep warm.
5. In a small bowl, mash the cheese with a fork.  Add the pasta cooking water and
wine.  Stir with the fork until creamy.
6. Toss the pasta with the cheese mixture.  Top with the roasted vegetables and toss
to mix.  Season generously with salt and pepper.  Serve at once.
 
Vegetable Puree Pancakes
From Nourishing Traditions 
 
1 cup leftover vegetable puree or mashed vegetables, such as winter squash, potatoes, etc.
1 small onion, peeled and finely chopped
1 egg, slightly beaten
¼ cup flour
Sea salt
Black pepper
2 T butter
2 T olive oil
Grated cheese, optional
 
1. Puree leftovers if they are not already mashed or pureed.  Mix with chopped
onion, egg and flour and season to taste.
2. Melt butter and olive oil in a heavy skillet.  Drop puree mixture in by spoonfuls
and sauté pancakes until golden.  Turn and sauté other side until golden.
3. Eat immediately or remove to a heated platter or warm oven until ready to serve.
Sprinkle grated cheese on top if desired.
 
Winter-Vegetable Shepherd’s Pie
From Vegetable Main Dishes “You have considerable leeway in assembling the ingredients for this English-inspired meal in a dish, but there should always be carrots, onions, and at least three other vegetables, one of them green.  Leftover mashed potatoes work fine to top the vegetable stew, which can be browned under the broiler or in a hot oven. Serves 4.
2 pounds baking potatoes (about 4), peeled or scrubbed and cut into large pieces.
1- ½  tsp. salt
¾ tsp. fresh ground black pepper
1 cup heavy cream
1 clove garlic, minced
6 T. butter
2 large onions, sliced
4 cups sliced mixed winter vegetables, such as celery, turnips, parsnips, cabbage,
celeriac, beets, Swiss chard or kale
2 carrots, sliced
3 cups canned low-sodium chicken broth or homemade stock
½ tsp. dried thyme
 
1. Put potatoes in a medium saucepan of salted water.  Bring to a boil, reduce the
heat, and simmer until the potatoes are tender, about 15 minutes.  Drain the
potatoes and put them back into the saucepan along with 1 tsp. of the salt and ¼
tsp. of the pepper. Mash the potatoes over a very low heat, gradually
incorporating the cream and 4 T. of the butter. Cover and set aside.
2. Meanwhile, in a Dutch oven, melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over
moderately low heat.  Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden
brown, about 10 minutes.  Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1
minute.  Stir in the sliced mixed vegetables, carrots, thyme, and the remaining ½
tsp. each of salt and pepper.  Mix well.
3. Stir in the broth and bring to a simmer.  Cook over moderate heat, covered, until
the vegetables start to soften, 5 to 10 minutes.  Uncover, increase the heat to
moderately high and cook until the vegetables are tender and almost no liquid
remains in the pan, about 10 minutes longer.
4. Heat the broiler.  Transfer the vegetables to a 9-inch pie plate, spread the potatoes
over the top, and cook until lightly browned, about 5 minutes.

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This entry was posted in celeriac, celery, gluten free, leeks, parsnips, Preserving!, pumpkin, rutabaga, sweet potato, vegan, vegetarian, winter squash. Bookmark the permalink.

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